alcohol1

Alcohol related harm at night, and how young people are drinking

Two significant reports were released in the past week, both showing different aspects of alcohol related harm – from harm prevention in the night-time economy to the latest statistics on how young people are drinking.

Dealing with alcohol-related harm and the night-time economy (DANTE) is a major research project conducted into harm prevention activities conducted in Geelong, Vic and Newcastle, NSW. Strategies employed in these localities included lock-outs, liquor accords, dry zones, CCTV networks, safe taxi ranks, and ID scanners, as well as state-level interventions. The study concluded that:

  • much of the violence and disorder occurs outside venues – on the streets or in the suburbs
  • the phenomenon of pre-loading (planned heavy drinking before  going out) is increasing
  • the most recent interventions focused on fining individuals for low level offences are showing the greatest promise
  • these interventions rely on adequate police resourcing.

2011 data on Australian secondary school students’ use of tobacco, alcohol and over-the-counter and illicit substances has also been released. The 2011 Australian Secondary Students’ Alcohol and Drug survey (ASSAD) was conducted during the academic school year of 2011. Some key findings include:

  • around 3 out of 4 students between 12 and 17 had consumed alcohol at least once in their lives
  • 51% had drunk alcohol in the 12 months preceding the survey, with 17% having drunk alcohol in the past 7 days
  • 19% of 17 year olds had consumed more than 4 standard drinks in the past 7 days
  • current drinkers obtained their alcohol mostly from parents (33%) or friends (23%)

Miller P et al 2012 Dealing with alcohol-related harm and the night-time economy (DANTE) final report, Canberra: National Drug Law Enforcement Research Fund (NDLERF) [PDF: 7.65MB]

White V; Bariola E 2012 Australian secondary school students’ use of tobacco, alcohol, and over-the-counter and illicit substances in 2011, Melbourne: The Cancer Council, Victoria [PDF: 1.52MB]